Vegetarian food blog featuring nourishing home cooked recipes, creative baking and luscious chocolate.

Henk’s Chocolate Nut Cakes

Small Cakes | 27th November 2015 | By

My friend Henk, over in The Netherlands is a keen baker. Like me, he’s interested in trying out different flours, particularly in cakes. Recently he sent me a recipe for his favourite chocolate nut muffins. They have undergone many iterations, I should add and more will follow as just like me, Henk is an inveterate ‘tinkerer’ of recipes.

These chocolate nut cakes – for to me they are more cake than muffin – are made with a little rye flour, Baileys and lots of nuts and chocolate. How could I resist? They were also meant to be made with spelt, but as I’d run out of that at the time, I used our local stoneground wholemeal flour instead. I made a number of other changes too, according to what I had in the house and the size and quantity I wanted. Henk reckons his recipe makes twenty large muffins, I wanted to make twenty four large mini cakes, if that makes any kind of sense. I’m a big fan of little cakes. You can eat one with little guilt, but the two or three mouthfuls you get make it seem quite substantial. And then, of course, you can always have a second.

Chocolate Nut Cakes

I can see why these chocolate nut cakes are a favourite with Henk. They are easy to make, moist, flavoursome and have a surprisingly light sponge. The nuts add texture and the chocolate chips give bursts of sweet and rich unctuousness. The baileys added a note of luxury and the flavour came through surprisingly well given there wasn’t an awful lot of it in the mix. Ten out of ten I reckon.

Henk's Chocolate Nut Cakes
Yields 24
Little chocolate nut cakes made with wholemeal flours and filled with chocolate chips. The sponge is moist and surprising light.
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
40 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
40 min
Ingredients
  1. 100g unsalted butter
  2. 120g light muscovado sugar (Henk uses the Dutch sugar 'basterdsuiker'
  3. 180g wholemeal flour (Henk uses spelt)
  4. 40g rye flour
  5. 20g cocoa powder
  6. 1 rounded tsp baking powder
  7. 25g hazelnuts - ground
  8. 80g mixed nuts (I used macadamias and almonds) - chopped
  9. 50g white chocolate chips
  10. 50g dark chocolate chips
  11. 2 eggs (medium or large)
  12. 140ml yoghurt (Henk uses goat's milk yoghurt)
  13. 30ml Baileys
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter and sugar in a pan over a small heat.
  2. Whisk the dry ingredients together in a large bowl to ensure there are no lumps and everything is well mixed.
  3. Stir in the chocolate and nuts.
  4. Make a well in the middle and add the sugar mixture together with the eggs, yoghurt and Baileys.
  5. Stir from the inside out until everything is just combined.
  6. Divide the mixture between 24 mini silicone muffin moulds, filling them almost to the top.
  7. Bake at 180C for ten minutes, then turn the oven down to 150C for a further ten minutes when the cakes should be well risen and firm to the touch.
  8. Allow the cakes to rest for a few minutes in the moulds, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool.
Notes
  1. Can make 12 regular sized muffins instead of 24 mini ones.
Adapted from Henk's recipe for Chocolate Nut Muffins
Adapted from Henk's recipe for Chocolate Nut Muffins
Tin and Thyme http://tinandthyme.uk/
 Shop Local BadgeWith the use of our local stoneground flour and eggs, I’m sending this recipe off to Elizabeth’s Kitchen Diary for Shop Local.

 

 

Bake of the Week BadgeI’m also sending these chocolate nut cakes off to Casa Costello for #BakeOfTheWeek

Some other un-iced chocolate cakes you might like

Comments

  1. Leave a Reply

    Janie
    27th November 2015

    Mmmm, I bet these are really moist & moreish. Also love the idea of using Baileys in a cake recipe, clever Henk!
    Janie x

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      27th November 2015

      Yes, Henk is a baking star. These or something similarly Baileys inspired might be making an appearance around Christmas πŸ™‚

  2. Leave a Reply

    Becca @ Amuse Your Bouche
    27th November 2015

    I agree with you about little cakes! It also means that everyone can choose how much they want – light eaters can have one, greedier people can have two or three haha πŸ˜‰ These look yummy!

  3. Leave a Reply

    Dom
    27th November 2015

    oh my word… Bailey’s cupcakes… I could do this with mint bailey’s! Amazing!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      28th November 2015

      Thanks Danni. I’m not sure how healthy they are, but they are small πŸ˜‰

  4. Leave a Reply

    Henk Kooiman
    27th November 2015

    They look very neat as well as delicious Choclette ! Good idea to make them in this size. Thanks for posting my recipe; I consider it an honour :)) As with the cookies and the buns, I am confused about the difference between muffins and cakes. As long as they taste good I am not too bothered though ….

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      28th November 2015

      Glad you approve Henk. Thanks again for the recipe. As for cookies, biscuits, muffins, fairy cakes, buns – the list goes on – we English love to debate what should be called what and we all think differently, so no wonder it’s confusing.

  5. Leave a Reply

    What Kate Baked
    29th November 2015

    I completely agree Choclette – little cakes versus bigger ‘uns and the teeny ones always get my vote! Trouble is I can’t stop at one, especially I suspect if baileys is involved!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      29th November 2015

      Well yes, there is that Kate. But it’s a good way of kidding oneself another one won’t hurt πŸ˜‰

  6. Leave a Reply

    Kavey
    30th November 2015

    Weirdly, we’ve experimented with different flours for bread making and yet never for cake making! Thanks for the thought, I need to get on to this!!!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      30th November 2015

      Rye in the mix, weirdly gives quite a smooth texture to cakes I’ve found. I’ve tried loads of different flours and quite like buckwheat as part of a mix too.

  7. Leave a Reply

    Prateek
    30th November 2015

    I love the recipe especially the innovative use of both white and dark chocolate, macademia nuts a personal favorite of mine. I haven’t used Bailey’s and Yogurt together , that sounds quite interesting!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      1st December 2015

      Thanks Prateek. All those flavours and textures make for lots of depth and interest. I too am a fan of macadamia nuts – they remind me of sunny days in Australia.

  8. Leave a Reply

    Christine | Vermilion Roots
    30th November 2015

    The ingredients are so wholesome. I enjoy baking with rye and spelt a lot. I think they give cakes and muffins a lot of character and that nice depth of flavor.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      1st December 2015

      Thanks Christine, baking is so much more exciting now that we have such a glorious wealth of ingredients at our disposal.

  9. Leave a Reply

    Phil in the Kitchen
    30th November 2015

    I’m seriously fond of nut cakes and, for some reason, they seem perfect for winter afternoons with a cup of something warming. These would fit the bill just perfectly. Baileys is not exactly my favourite drink but in baking it’s a different story. I confess to loving the word basterdsuiker, by the way.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      1st December 2015

      Haha Phil, it’s a great word Phil and had me smiling when I saw it. I guess we’re all programmed to eat nuts at this time of year in the UK, so it just seems right.

  10. Leave a Reply

    Cindy
    1st December 2015

    Oh these look great! Perfect for Christmas!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      1st December 2015

      Thanks Cindy. You’re right, nuts, chocolate and Baileys, what more do you need for christmas πŸ˜‰

  11. Leave a Reply

    Dia @ All The Things I Do
    1st December 2015

    Thes look so yummy. I love baking it soothes me. I don’t have a huge sweet tooth so I end up giving it away but it looks like this wouldn’t be overly sweet.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      1st December 2015

      My bakes tend to be a bit less sweet than the average as I am conscious about the sugar issue. You must have some very lucky neighbours Dia πŸ˜‰

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      2nd December 2015

      Yes, me too Sarah. I keep wanting to explore more German ones too.

  12. Leave a Reply

    Henk Kooiman
    2nd December 2015

    It’s very nice to read all these positive comments !
    To properly explore the German pastry world I’d suggest to reserve another life after this one. And two if you’d like to include Austria and Hungary, which share a similar tradition. There is so much more than just Sachertorte and SchwarzwΓ€lder Kirschtorte.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      3rd December 2015

      Haha, yes, I think that’s why I might not have started Henk. As for the comments, you are a talented baker.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      3rd December 2015

      I’ve used Bailey’s in a few bakes now and it does seem to work very well …… hic!

  13. Leave a Reply

    Glamorous Glutton
    6th December 2015

    These sound perfect for giving as a festive gift, tied up singly in cellophane, or in couples with a bow they would be fab. GG

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      7th December 2015

      Now what a splendid idea GG. I still haven’t quite figured out what I’ll be making for Christmas gifts this year, but this is a possibility.

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