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Pistachio Biscuits with Rose and Almonds

Pistachio Biscuits

Of all the biscuits I made in my epic Christmas bake last year, these pistachio biscuits made with almonds and flavoured with a little rose, cardamom and cinnamon were the ones that received the most rave reviews. So *drum roll* I’m finally going to give you the recipe. It’s the next in my Flavours of the Middle East series.

Whilst these pistachio biscuits make an excellent Christmas gift, they’d be just as good for any celebration throughout the year. Made slightly smaller and a little neater, they’d also make excellent wedding flavour favours. They keep remarkably well and although they might soften over time, they are just as delicious and have a nice slightly chewy texture.

I adapted a recipe in Bake it Better Biscuits by Annie Rigg that I borrowed from the library. I used our local wholemeal flour, of course and made a few other tweaks to the ingredients and method.

Pistachio Biscuits with Rose and Almonds
Yields 38
Crisp and crumbly nutty shortbread type biscuits flavoured with a little cardamom, cinnamon and rose. Ideal as a Christmas gift.
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 100g blanched almonds
  2. 125g unsalted butter
  3. 100g golden caster sugar
  4. pinch of Himalayan pink rock salt
  5. 5 drops cardamom Holy Lama spice drops or 5 green cardamom pods
  6. 1 drop cinnamon Holy Lama spice drops or ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  7. 2 drops rose Holy Lama spice drops or 1-2 tsp rosewater
  8. 50g pistachos
  9. 125g wholemeal flour
  10. 125g plain flour
  11. ½ tsp baking powder
  12. 1 tbsp water
  13. 2 heaped tbsp icing sugar
Instructions
  1. Toast the almonds in a hot oven for 4-6 minutes until lightly golden. Do take care not to burn them. Leave to cool.
  2. Cream the butter and sugar until light and creamy. Add the salt and spices and cream some more.
  3. Blitz the almonds and pistachios in a coffee grinder or food processor until roughly ground. It's good to have some powdered and some bits for a bit of extra texture and crunch.
  4. Mix into the butter mixture.
  5. Sieve in the flours and baking powder and mix until incorporated.
  6. Stir in the water and then gather together with your hands to form into a ball of dough.
  7. Take off walnut sized lumps and roll them into balls.
  8. Place onto lined baking sheets, slightly apart.
  9. Bake at 180℃ for about 15 minutes or until lightly golden.
  10. Allow to cool for a few minutes.
  11. Sieve the icing sugar into a bowl, then roll the biscuits to cover, one by one.
  12. Place on a wire rack to cool completely, then dust lightly with any remaining icing sugar.
Adapted from Bake It Better Biscuits by Annie Rigg
Adapted from Bake It Better Biscuits by Annie Rigg
Tin and Thyme http://tinandthyme.uk/
Tea Time Treats LogoAs I used our local wholemeal flour from Cotehele Mill, I’m sending these pistachio biscuits off to Tea Time Treats hosted by Lavender and Lovage and The Hedge Combers. The theme this month is Local Ingredients and Recipes.

Other recipes for pistachio biscuits or almond cookies

Comments

  1. Leave a Reply

    Sammie
    29th April 2016

    Ooh Choclette these look so yummy. Please don’t hate me – but I really struggle with cardamom. I keep trying it but just can’t get my body to like it. Would these work without it? Sorry to be a pain. Sammie x

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      29th April 2016

      Hahaha, not everyone has to like everything Sammie. I’m sure these would work fine without cardamom. You might want to up the cinnamon slightly or maybe add a little lemon zest instead.

  2. Leave a Reply

    Henk
    29th April 2016

    I’d love to try these. The combination of flavours is very appealing. Last week I happened to have bought a new little bottle of rose water ….

  3. Leave a Reply

    Kavey
    29th April 2016

    These sound so gorgeous, love all the flavours. But Pete’s our resident baker and he has taken against both cardamom and pistachios. Perhaps I’ll have to make them myself?!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      29th April 2016

      Oh no Kavey, that’s no good. Sounds like you need to make these biscuits and convince him just how good these flavours are.

  4. Leave a Reply

    Aimee
    29th April 2016

    I am obsessed with Middle Eastern flavours – I think I could love on that food alone, actually. These are so so gorgeous! Thanks for linking to my cookies too 🙂

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      29th April 2016

      Middle Eastern flavours are wonderful indeed. They aren’t too in your face, but are beautifully aromatic and very tasty.

  5. Leave a Reply

    Cathy @ Planet Veggie
    29th April 2016

    Like someone else commented, I don’t like cardamom either but I can just leave that out, as these biscuits look lovely.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      29th April 2016

      Hmmm, seems cardamom is not doing to well at the moment – all very strange 😉 But yes, as you say, it can just be left out.

  6. Leave a Reply

    Vicky
    29th April 2016

    Oh what fantastic flavours! Like some of the others, I’m not overly keen on cardamom on its own but find it works beautifully with other flavours and I imagine when it’s blended with the rosewater and cinnamon flavours these biscuits taste delicious. I’ve never heard of Holy Lama spice drops before, I just looked them up, I might treat myself to some. Thank you also for sharing my cookie recipe.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      29th April 2016

      Yes, it seems cardamom isn’t as popular with some as it is with me. I have a jar of sugar with a load of cardamoms in, which gives a subtle citrus flavour to bakes which might be better for those not too keen. The spice drops don’t lose their potency like ground spices, so they are great for spices yo don’t use very often.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      30th April 2016

      Yay, another cardamom fan Angie. It’s quite a subtle flavour combined with the others, but it works really well in a sweet biscuit.

  7. Leave a Reply

    Camilla
    29th April 2016

    These biscuits look and sound amazing, love almonds in biscuits:-) Thanks for linking to my recipe:-)

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      30th April 2016

      Thanks Camilla. Almonds are a wonderful nut and work so well in pretty much any form of baking.

  8. Leave a Reply

    Jean | DelightfulRepast.com
    30th April 2016

    Choclette, this is just the sort of biscuit I love with a nice cuppa tea! Have all the ingredients on hand except the pistachios, will have to pick some up today and get baking!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      30th April 2016

      Oh do give them a go and let me know what you think Jean. I’m very tempted to whip up a batch soon too.

  9. Leave a Reply

    Dom
    30th April 2016

    love these… adore almonds in most things but in biscuits they are the best!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      30th April 2016

      Oh yes, almond biscuits are fab, but they are a little bit more fab if they are combined with pistachios 😉

  10. Leave a Reply

    the caked crusader
    1st May 2016

    Look lovely, but like one of your other commenters, I haven’t found my cardamom love yet! Sure they’d be ace without

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      1st May 2016

      Oh goodness not you too CC. I’m pretty certain they would be ace without though, as you say 🙂

  11. Leave a Reply

    Nayna Kanabar
    1st May 2016

    These look really delicious and I love all the middle eastern flavours you have used in them.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      1st May 2016

      Thanks Nayna, the spices go wonderfully well with the rose and nuts – at least I think so 😉

  12. Leave a Reply

    Henk Kooiman
    20th July 2016

    Finally made them ! I changed a few minor things in the ingredients: 100 g wholemeal spelt + 30 g corn flour + 50 g rice flour + 70 g white spelt. Also I changed the way the dough is made, to make it simpler. With these ingredients nothing could go wrong tastewise , I thought. And indeed, the cookies are very delicous and nice and brittle, mmmmmhhhhh. Nice flavour and good aftertaste, not too sweet and not too fat. What a pity pistachio’s are so very expensive. Last time I paid 3.50 €/100 g ….

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      21st July 2016

      Glad they worked Henk. I’m feeling I have a biscuit deficiency in my life at the moment, so I might have to make some for myself. But yes, pistachios are very expensive, which is why I think of them as a Christmas treat.

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