Vegetarian food blog featuring delicious and nutritious whole food recipes, creative baking and luscious chocolate.

Toffee Apple Hazelnut Cake for Bonfire Night or Other Autumnal Occasions

Toffee Apple Hazelnut Cake with Smoky Salted Caramel Sauce

Autumn, Large Cakes | 15th October 2017 | By

The leaves are turning, the mornings are misty and the season of mellow fruitfulness has definitely arrived. There are apples aplenty here in the New Forest and apple cake is an autumnal essential bake. For Bonfire Night last year, I reckon I created my best ever. It’s a toffee apple hazelnut cake and is just perfect for this time of year.

(more…)

Blackberry & Apple Spelt Pancakes with Brown Buttered Cobnuts

Blackberry & Apple Spelt Pancakes with Brown Buttered Cobnuts

September is the month for blackberries, apples and green cobnuts. Yes cobnuts are good at Christmas to be sure, but eat them fresh in September and it’s quite a different experience. These blackberry & apple spelt pancakes with brown buttered cobnuts are a taste sensation – truly.

(more…)

Cinnamon Coconut Chocolate Crunch – A Traybake with Attitude

Cinnamon Coconut Chocolate Crunch Traybake

Traybakes | 13th August 2017 | By

This cinnamon coconut chocolate crunch traybake is a real crowd pleaser. It’s ideal for parties where both children and adults will love it. It has less sugar than similar bakes, but its nutty crunchiness will have you coming back for more. It’s quick and easy to make; the hardest part is waiting for the chocolate crunch to cool and set.

(more…)

Chilli Roasted Oca with Hedgerow Pesto – Two Recipes for the Price of One

Chilli Roasted Oca with Hedgerow Pesto

Have you grown ocas, been given some or found them in your veg box? Not sure how to cook them? These chilli roasted oca tubers make a delicious, colourful and easy meal with wild garlic and hazelnut pesto and some sort of green on the side.

(more…)

Apple and Hazelnut Spelt Rye Sourdough Bread Loaf

Apple Hazelnut Spelt Rye Sourdough Bread

Autumn, Bread & Buns, Vegan | 7th October 2016 | By

As you may have gathered by now, I do like to cook and bake with the seasons. When I made my latest Suma order I had some autumnal baking very much in mind. I still have apples from my mother’s garden and although the wildlife got all of our cobnuts this year, hazelnuts are very much on my radar. So, I made an apple and hazelnut spelt rye sourdough bread loaf.

(more…)

Chocolate Hazelnut Crackles

Biscuits, Gifts | 28th December 2014 | By

Chocolate Hazelnut Cookies

These chocolate hazelnut crackles were a Christmas gift bake that I made last year. They were so good, I meant to make them again this year. But flu got in the way and my Christmas baking was minimal.

I bookmarked this recipe from Apple & Spice a very long time ago. The biscuits are made with ground roasted hazelnuts which immediately grabbed my attention. However,  the first time I made them for Christmas 2012, I was fast running out of time and space in the kitchen, so swapped the hazelnuts for ground almonds. They were really good and proved to be highly popular with the recipients. But the fragrance and flavour of these ones made with freshly roasted hazelnuts beat the ground almonds hands down.

Chocolate Hazelnut Biscuits

The house smelt gorgeous whilst these were being made; first the aroma of roasting hazelnuts filled the air and then again when the biscuits were in the oven. Rolled in icing sugar before baking, these cookies are visually striking and conjure up a snowy Christmas with sleigh bells ringing. The biscuits expand, revealing dark crevices beneath the white icing. Rich, indulgent, chewy and delicious these are some of the best biscuits I’ve ever made. I’d thought they were set to be a regular feature on my Christmas baking schedule, so I’m quite sorry I didn’t manage to make any this year.

This is how I made:

Chocolate Hazelnut Crackles

  • Roasted 80g hazelnuts at 180C for about ten minutes in order to give flavour and loosen their skins.
  • Rubbed in a piece of kitchen towel to remove skins.
  • Left to cool, then blitzed with 30g caster sugar to reduce to a finish crumb.
  • Melted 175g dark 72% chocolate in a large bowl over hot water.
  • Added 100g of unsalted butter – cubed. Stirred until melted.
  • Beat in 275g dark muscovado sugar.
  • Stirred in 1 tsp vanilla extract.
  • Beat in 3 smallish eggs (or use 2 large eggs).
  • Sifted in 330g flour (half wholemeal spelt, half white), 20g cocoa powder, 2 tsp baking powder, a large pinch of rock salt and 1 heaped tsp of mesquite powder.
  • Added the ground hazelnuts and 2 tbsp milk.
  • Stirred until combined.
  • Left in my cold kitchen for a couple of hours until firm – no need for a fridge at this time of year.
  • Sifted 100g icing sugar into a bowl.
  • Wet hands with cold water and rolled mixture into walnut sized balls between my palms.
  • Rolled balls in icing sugar until thickly coated and placed well apart on lined baking trays.
  • Baked at 180C for about 12 minutes until cracked and well risen.

 

I’m sending this off to Jac at Tinned Tomatoes as it is a Bookmarked Recipe.

Coffee Pop-In with Roasted Hazelnut Brownies

Hazelnut Brownies
 Everyone is so busy dashing about at this time of year that it can be hard to organise a festive gathering of friends. When I was recently sent a rather snazzy coffee machine to put through its paces, my thoughts immediately turned to hosting a coffee morning. Afternoon tea is more my style and as my blog bears witness, I have often thrown an impromptu tea party. But a coffee morning when friends could drop by on their way into or out of town and grab a drink and piece of cake along with a quick chat seemed more appropriate this time. Pop-ups are all the rage, but I thought I’d stage my own pop-in.

(more…)

Jerusalem Artichoke Cake – We Should Cocoa #41

Jerusalem Artichoke Cake

A friend recently passed on a recipe for me to chocolatify. He reckoned that not only was this cake unusual, with its inclusion of Jerusalem artichokes, but it was also possibly the best cake he’d ever made. I was intrigued. At this time of year we have no problem getting hold of this particular root vegetable as it grows, almost of its own volition, down on our plot. I adore the taste of artichokes, but do find them a real pain to clean, so I don’t use them as often as I probably should. The cake includes roasted hazelnuts and I could see how well these would work with the nutty flavour found in artichokes.

I had planned to follow the recipe as written, apart from adding chocolate and using my usual half wholemeal, half white flour mix of course, but things went a little awry.  I didn’t have any raisins for a start, so had to substitute sultanas. But mostly, I didn’t read the recipe carefully enough. I ended up using a different method entirely and added all of the sugar (50g more than I should have) to the cake rather than reserving some of it for the icing – oops! I also didn’t think I needed to peel the artichokes, which I scrubbed well cutting out any bad bits.

Some time before Christmas, I was sent three lovely bags of Cacao Barry chocolate drops. This is a new range of high quality couverture chocolate they have introduced. It uses a new fermentation method which purportedly gives a more intense taste. The Q-Fermentation TM method uses natural ferments found in the plants and soil of the plantation which is said to give a purer bean with a fuller flavour. I’m looking forward to trying the chocolate out in a few sophisticated recipes where the flavour can shine through. However, I decided as there were so many lovely ingredients in this cake it would be good to use a special chocolate too. From previous experience, I’ve found that milk chocolate chips tend to work better in this type of cake as a very dark chocolate can sometimes take over rather than enhancing. The 41% Alunga milk chocolate seemed ideal. With its strong caramel notes and high cocoa content, I found it hard to stop dipping into the bag as I went along. I’m looking forward to trying the Inaya 65% and Ocoa 70% dark chocolates in due course.

This is how I made:

Jerusalem Artichoke Cake

Jerusalem Artichoke Cake

  • Added 1 tbsp brandy to a bowl filled with 120g sultanas and placed it on the heater to soak in for about an hour.
  • Toasted 80g hazelnuts in a dry frying pan for a few minutes until the nuts had browned a little and the skins had loosened. Left to cool, then rubbed the nuts in a piece of kitchen towel to remove the skins. Chopped roughly.
  • Grated 200g of well scrubbed and trimmed Jerusalem artichokes in food processor.
  • Creamed 150g unsalted butter with 200g soft brown sugar (should have been 150g).
  • Beat in the brandied sultanas.
  • Beat in 3 large eggs, one by one and alternating with a little of the flour.
  • Sieved in 200g flour (half wholemeal, half white), 1 level tsp baking powder, 1 scant tsp bicarbonate of soda, a large pinch of rock salt, 1 tsp cinnamon and a good grating of nutmeg (about 1/2 tsp).
  • Stirred this in lightly together with the nuts and 50g chocolate drops (41% milk).
  • Folded in the artichokes.
  • Scraped mixture into a deep 8″ lined cake tin and baked for about 1 hour at 180°C (recipe stated 30 minutes, but mine was still almost raw at that stage) until well risen, brown and an inserted skewer came out almost clean.
  • Allowed to cook in the tin for 15 minutes, then turned out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  • Beat 180g cream cheese (should have been 200g, but that was all I had) with 40 light brown sugar.
  • Grated in the zest of an organic lemon and squeezed in nearly half of the juice.
  • Beat it all together then slathered over the top of the cake.
  • Shaved some dark chocolate over the top.
Jerusalem Artichoke Cake

I couldn’t have told you there were Jerusalem artichokes in the cake, but wow, I’m sure they added to the overall nuttiness. This cake was truly delicious: chewy, crunchy, moist and abundant. The Alunga buttons left chocolatey hotspots throughout the cake which contributed nicely to the overall richness of taste. The sharp lemony icing offset the additional sugar I added by mistake and the cake, thankfully, wasn’t too sweet at all. It was similar to a carrot cake, only, dare I say it, much nicer.

How can I put this politely? I didn’t notice any, er, unfortunate consequences to eating the Jerusalem Artichokes in this way, so it got a double thumbs up from us.

This is my offering for this month’s We Should Cocoa. Linzi over at Lancashire Food is kindly hosting and has asked us to combine an ingredient we have never used with chocolate before. I was initially going to send over the paprika and cocoa roasted cauliflower that I made earlier in the month, but in the end decided this was a more unusual and worthy entry. I can honestly say, that I have never until now, eaten Jerusalem artichokes and chocolate together.

I am also using this as my entry to Family Foodies over at Bangers & Mash. The theme this month is Hidden Goodies. These artichokes are very well hidden and I suspect few would ever guess as to what the cake contained. This challenge is co-hosted by Lou at Eat Your Veg.

Not only made from scratch, but some of it grown from scratch too, I’m sending this off to Javelin Warrior for his Made with Love Mondays.

 

As this is the most exciting recipe I’ve posted this week, I’m entering it into Recipe of the Week with Emily of A Mummy Too.

Chocolate and Hazelnut Ladoo

Chocolates | 3rd September 2013 | By

 Indian sweets have long held a fascination for me, they are so very different to our own. I got my first taste of them when I was a student living in London where a couple of Indian sweet shops were located just around the corner from the faculty building. Later on, living in the Midlands, I was surrounded by balti houses and Indian supermarkets so I was able to indulge from time to time. Now I live back home in Cornwall, I no longer have that option. Luckily Devnaa, an online purveyor of Indian inspired confectionery, has come to the rescue. Indian-Inspired Desserts, their book written by co-founder Roopa Rawal enables me to make my own.

(more…)

Garibaldi Biscuits with a Difference – We Should Cocoa #24

Chocolate Garibaldi Biscuits aka Squashed Flies

Recipe for crisp homemade garibaldi biscuits with a difference. These ones are heavily studded with hazelnut chocolate rather than currants. Why not. Read on to find out how to make them and also what Garibaldi was up to in Cornwall.

(more…)