Vegetarian food blog featuring delicious and nutritious whole food recipes, creative baking and luscious chocolate.

Green Smoothie Bowl with Pear, Avocado & Almonds

Double Pear & Almond Green Smoothie Bowl

This double pear green smoothie bowl is a firm favourite with us. In fact everyone who’s tried it has been impressed and wanted the recipe. It’s rich, filling and delicious. It’s also packed full of nutrients and keeps me going for hours. That’s at least two of your five-a-day done and dusted by breakfast.

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Pear Almond Butter from a Nut Butter Fail

Pear Almond Butter

Failed nut butter may not sound like the most promising of posts, but do read on. I unwittingly turned my failure to make almond butter into a delicious pear almond butter, which is definitely worth blogging about.

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Easy Gingered Pear Almond Honey Cakes for Bonfire Night

Gingered Pear Almond Honey Cakes

Autumn pears, fragrant honey and warming ginger come together for an easy bonfire night bake. These gingered pear almond honey cakes are not only delicious, but are easily portable. They’re  the perfect antidote to overhyped Halloween and its transatlantic excesses. They can be eaten whilst watching the bonfire flames dance and the Catherine wheels spin – no tricks, just treats.

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Chocolate Pear Cardamom Upside-Down Cake

Cake, Large Cakes | 27th September 2014 | By

Harvest festival meets Random Recipes meets Clandestine Cake Club in this post. As we had a hard challenge for August, Dom has gone easy on us this month and it’s back to the basics of picking a random book from our collection and then a random recipe from that book. I used my usual Eat Your Books method of selection and came up with a recipe for a simple chocolate pear upside-down cake in Jennifer Donovan’s book Chocolate. Happily this pick coincided with a Cornwall Clandestine Cake Club gathering on Thursday where the theme was harvest festival. And to tie it all together in a nice little bundle, my mother turned up with a jar of pears that she’d just poached. All sorted.

I had to add my own twist of course, so apart from using poached pears rather than raw ones, I substituted the vanilla for cardamom. The cake was fudgy and chocolatey, but the cardamom and pear stopped it being too sweet and sickly. It was in fact a delicious cake I will be repeating and the good folk at cake club seemed to enjoy it.

This is how I made:

Chocolate Pear Cardamom Upside-Down Cake

  • Melted 200g butter with 200g of dark 70% chocolate in a large saucepan over low heat.
  • Stirred in 150g cardamom sugar (golden caster sugar) and left to cool a little.
  • Beat in three duck eggs (large hens eggs will be fine) with 1 drop of the excellent Holy Lama cardamom extract (or the ground seeds from 1-2 cardamom pods, depending on how subtle you want the flavour).
  • Sifted in 120g self-raising flour and stirred gently until just combined.
  • Sprinkled 3 tbsp of dark brown sugar over the base of a 9″ round silicon mould.
  • Lay 12 pear quarters on top of the sugar then poured the batter over the top.
  • Baked at 180℃ for 30 minutes until just done.
  • Left to cool for about ten minutes, then turned the cake upside down onto a serving plate.

 

The harvest festival theme resulted in a bounty of fruit and vegetable cakes. The cake shown here completely stole the show, but they were all very tasty and yes, I did manage to try a piece of each! An independent wine merchant with accompanying champagne and coffee bar, Bin Two in Padstow, was our venue and some of the participants seemed much more interested in the wine than they did in the cake. The shop included a cafe bar, so we all crowded and got up close and cosy. Thanks as always to Ellie Mitchell for organising another splendid cakey gathering.

Bin Two were hosting a Macmillan Coffee Morning the following day, so I also brought along a few oaty ginger biscuits. These were quite fiery as they were not only flavoured with ground ginger but included crystallised ginger too. CT got almost grumpy when he was only allowed to try one.

So this is another success I put down to Dom and his Random Recipes over at Belleau Kitchen – such a fun and interesting challenge – most of the time anyway!

I had a bit of a dilemma trying to decide which of this month’s seasonal recipes should be sent to Simple and in Season – there have been so many good ones. But despite the rather prosaic nature of pear after the colours and flavours of blackberry and plum, this cake deserves recognition. Nazima of Franglais Kitchen is hosting this month on behalf of Ren Behan.

Caramelised Pear and Honey Carob Cake (Gluten-Free)

Slice of Caramelised Pear and Honey Carob Cake.

Caramelised pears grace the top of this melt-in-the-mouth pudding type cake. This pear and honey carob cake is not only delicious, but relatively healthy too. It’s made with carob and buckwheat flour, so it’s gluten-free and honey rather than refined sugar.

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The Alchemist’s Chocolate Cake – Short and Tweet

Loaf Cakes | 7th January 2012 | By

Although I’d love to enter the Short and Tweet twitter challenge (#shortandtweet) every week, I know this is not feasible, but I am trying to enter it on a monthly basis. You can see the upcoming schedule of bakes here. This week I am not only still on holiday, but one of the chosen recipes is a chocolate cake – errr – no brainer! This has been chosen because of the January austerity measures imposed on our stomachs – it contains only a small amount of fat and sugar using pears as a partial substitute.

As I only had a small (220g) pack of pears left behind by a Japanese visitor, I made approximately half the quantity. It was a bit difficult to half three eggs, but as they weren’t particularly big, I used two and rounded up the other ingredients rather than down to compensate. The only convenient sized mould I had was a loaf tin, so that is what I used. Not having any walnut oil to hand, which I’m sure would have been really good, I used a combination of sunflower and pumpkin seed.

I upped the calories a little, by drizzling on some 37% G&B milk chocolate – or perhaps blobbing is a better description. It’s certainly not as pretty as Dan’s picture in the book. You can see his recipe, originally published in the Guardian, here.

Without giving any clues as to it’s identity, I asked CT what he thought. This was his stream of consciousness whilst tasting “smells of cupcakes from my childhood. Resilient cake, not crumbly but has a springy texture. Not very sweet. Nice, slightly banana flavour, slightly grainy, like oats? Seems like the sort of thing someone from the 1950s, wearing a waistcoat, would be eating with a mug of tea, after a hard days graft in the fields”.

When he found out this was made with pears, he cried, “ahh sclereids” – blooming botanists! Sclereids are, apparently, the grainy bits you get in pears, so he wasn’t too far off the mark with the grainy and fruity associations

We both really liked this cake, both the flavour and texture and it really didn’t need the chocolate on top, although this did make for an, err, interesting look!