Vegetarian food blog featuring delicious and nutritious whole food recipes, creative baking and luscious chocolate.

Marmalade Runeberg Cakes for Mother’s Day

Runeberg Cakes

Small Cakes | 17th March 2015 | By

Tada! For my first recipe published on Tin and Thyme, I bring you some non chocolate baking. Runeberg cakes are a Finnish celebratory cake that was supposedly invented by the wife of poet Johan Ludvig Runberg for him to enjoy every morning for breakfast. How kind of Fredrika. They are made with an unusual mixture of breadcrumbs and ground almonds instead of flour. It’s a great way to use slightly stale bread. I tried this out earlier in the year with this rye bread and blackcurrant cake and the results were truly impressive.

(more…)

Matcha Marmalade Cakes and a Sushi Feast

Matcha Marmalade Cakes

Small Cakes | 12th November 2014 | By

Have you eaten matcha marmalade cakes before? No? They’re well worth trying. These little bites are flavoured with healthy green tea powder and marmalade. They’re not only delicious but also quick and simple to make.

(more…)

Chocolate, Cardamom and Marmalade Loaf

Marmalade Cake

Loaf Cakes | 12th January 2013 | By

Lovely CT bought me two books for Christmas, one was The Dessert Deli by Laura Amos, a book full of luscious and decedent desserts and the other was the acclaimed Scandilicious Baking by Signe Johansen, cook and fellow food blogger. I was particularly thrilled by the latter as I’ve heard much about Scandinavian baking, but actually know very little about it.

With the theme for Tea Time Treats being zesty citrus this month and the theme for One Ingredient being oranges, I was keen to make some sort of marmalade cake. I had a look on Eat Your Books and came up with a number of delicious and suitable recipes, but before going ahead, I thought I’d just check my new acquisition (not yet added to EYB). I have to say, I wasn’t very hopeful as marmalade is not something I associate with Scandinavia, but I was wrong. Signe had a recipe for a chocolate and orange marmalade loaf cake. That was the one for me, or at least the one I was going to adapt. As well as a jar of marmalade that needed using up, I also had half a small jar of the lemon marmalade I made just before Christmas – I fancied a St Clements Marmalade Cake. I’d also got it into my head that cardamom would pair very nicely with marmalade. Actually, I knew it did, due to the success of the nonnettes I made this time last year. So I omitted both the coffee and vanilla stated and added some ground cardamom instead.

This is how I did it:

  • Spooned 100 ml Seville orange marmalade and 100 ml lemon marmalade into a small bowl.
  • Juiced one large orange and stirred this into the marmalade.
  • Melted 100g salted butter and 200g runny honey in a pan over gentle heat, then left to cool slightly.
  • Sifted 200g flour (100g wholemeal, 80g white, 20g buckwheat) into a large bowl with 2 tsp baking powder and 1/4 tsp rock salt.
  • Sifted in 50g ground almonds and 50g cocoa powder.
  • Ground the seeds from 2 cardamom pods in a pestle and mortar and added this to the mix.
  • Made a well in the centre and poured in the butter and started to mix.
  • Added 2 medium eggs, mixing them in one by one, working outwards from the middle.
  • Added 2 tbsp yogurt and continued to mix.
  • Added half of the marmalade mixture and stirred until all incorporated.
  • Finally, stirred in 100 ml of warm water.
  • Poured the mixture into a 2 lb loaf mould and baked at 180C for 40 minutes.
  • Whilst still hot, pricked the cake all over with a skewer and poured the remaining marmalade mixture over the top.
  • Left to cool, then turned out onto a plate to serve.

This was my first introduction to Scandinavian baking and it won’t be my last; we both really enjoyed this cake. My photographs have by no means done it justice and I was a little disappointed with the holes, but it was moist with a sticky top or as CT described it (not very diplomatically I thought) “reassuringly pudding like”. Pudding like it may be, but its restrained sweetness means it probably won’t be as popular with the children. The cardamom flavour did as I hoped and complemented the citrussy tang and bitterness of the marmalade. It gained the seal of approval from my mother, who is a little hard to please when it comes to cakes.

 
As stated above, I am entering this into One Ingredient with Laura of How to Cook Good Food and Nazima of Franglais Kitchen.
 

This is my zingy start to the New Year and my entry to Tea Time Treats with Karen of Lavender and Lovage and Kate of What Kate Baked.

As I used up two half jars of marmalade, I am sneaking this into the new Credit Crunch Munch event started by Camilla of Fab Food for All and Helen of Fuss Free Flavours.

 
 

White Chocolate Nonnettes and Orange & Poppy Seed Friands

Having seen Phil’s We Should Cocoa entry in the Orange challenge from As Stong As Soup in December, I couldn’t resist making these for my mother’s birthday. Nonnettes, it seems, are little known outside of France. I searched on google for more information and alternative recipes, but Phil’s was the only one I could find in English (I gave up after page 6). The name means “little nuns” and they are a speciality of Dijon in France. They are little spiced honey cakes made with marmalade and rye flour and unusually, no eggs.

(more…)

Marmalade Cake for Mother’s Day

Marmalade Cake

Large Cakes | 15th April 2011 | By

Having made my first experiment using marmalade in cakes with this chocolate and marmalade cake and been won over by the result, I decided to have another go.

(more…)

Chocolate and Marmalade Cream Cake

Marmalade Cream Cake Slice

I’ve heard a lot about marmalade cakes, but for some reason or another the concept has not appealed and I have never, until now, used marmalade in my baking. However, when I saw a recipe for One-Mix Chocolate Sponge in my recently borrowed The Chocolate Cookbook by Christine France, something about the marmalade cream caught my fancy. I knew I wouldn’t be able to do a one-mix method because unless we have a really hot spell, my butter is never soft enough.

(more…)

Food Blog Theme from Nimbus
Powered by WordPress