Vegetarian food blog featuring delicious and nutritious whole food recipes, creative baking and luscious chocolate.

Easy Baileys Marbled Chocolate Ice Cream with Baileys Chocolate Sauce

Baileys Ice Cream with Baileys Chocolate Sauce

Ice Cream, Sauces | 3rd May 2015 | By

Who doesn’t like a drop of Baileys? I know I certainly do. I blame my grandfather. It was one of his favourite tipples which he took particular care to introduce to me at an early age. CT’s rather keen on it too as are many others judging by the 2,300 glasses that are consumed every minute of every day. But it’s not just a nice drink made with a blend of Irish whiskey, fresh cream, vanilla and chocolate essences, oh no. It’s also rather good as a cooking ingredient.

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Quick Tomato Sauce with Seaweed – No Cooking Required

Quick Tomato Sauce with Seaweed

Pasta is one of those standbys that is perfect for meals in a hurry. I often make tomato sauce to go with pasta and add carrots and onions and any other vegetables I happen to have around – parsnips work well. The other day, I was in even more of a hurry than usual and so I thought I’d try blending a raw tomato sauce instead. I was a little surprised at just how good this quick tomato sauce with seaweed was.

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Spiced Kefir Pancakes with Manuka Honey and Crème Fraîche Chocolate Sauce

Spiced Kefir Pancakes with manuka honey and crème fraîche chocolate sauce.

Despite my love of chocolate, cakes, biscuits, puddings and most things sweet, I do not, as it may seem, indulge all day long or even every day. Most of the time, I try to eat healthily. One of our regular breakfast ingredients is kefir, which CT has been making for many years now. We drink it as it is, use it in smoothies, on muesli and add it to porridge. I woke up one Sunday morning thinking, why don’t I try making pancakes out of it – not a revolutionary idea I’m sure, but I’d not thought of it before. Spiced kefir pancakes with manuka honey and crème fraîche chocolate sauce it was then.

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Chocolate Sundae Royale – We Should Cocoa

Chocolate Sundae Royale

This Chocolate Sundae Royale is a decadent chocolate ice-cream extravaganza. It’s made with dark and white chocolate ice-creams, chocolate caramel fudge sauce, blackcurrant brownies and some blackcurrant sauce to cut through the richness. All you need is a suitable celebration to justify the calories.

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Leftover Easter Egg Chocolate Ice Cream

Leftover Easter Egg Chocolate Ice Cream

The concept of a leftover Easter egg is something I find hard to get to grips with. In our house, uneaten Easter eggs must have something seriously wrong with them, or have fallen down the back of the sofa. The whole point of self-denial during Lent is to celebrate your resolve with a massive blow-out at the end, which is where the Easter eggs fit in. Fit into your stomach, I mean.

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Waffles with a Mapley Chocolate Sauce

Waffles

To me waffles have always seemed the height of elegance and sophistication. I’ve never eaten them here in the UK, but I have fond memories of the light and crispy delights offered to us at elegant establishments in Europe. On our visit to Ghent we had them served mit slagroom. Slagroom for the uninitiated is the Flemish for whipped cream. Jolly delicious they were too.

I think of waffles as a 3D pancake, with their neat little reservoirs which hold lots of butter, cream, syrup or whatever else you fancy to shorten your life. When I was sent some silicone waffle moulds from Lékué to try out, it didn’t take me long to drop those eggs and flour into a bowl and start mixing.

My enthusiasm for Lékué remains unchecked with this, the third product I have tried. You can read my previous posts on the bundt mould and the bread maker by clicking on the links. Having used silicone bakeware for years, I have experience of the good and the bad. The performance of cheap silicone moulds I’ve used in the past really isn’t that good. Thin material results in uneven baking with the bottoms getting burnt and the batter not being properly cooked. The Lékué silicone is sturdy and you can tell the products are of good quality by the look and feel of them. To boot, they come with a ten year guarantee. The pack contained two moulds, each with 4 waffle patterns. The waffle indentations were well defined and turned out perfect looking waffles. I found the moulds very easy to use and they gave a good result with a fluffy interior and a nice crispy exterior. I was slightly concerned about how easy it would be to release the waffles, but they slipped out of the moulds with no trouble at all. Not only that, but you don’t get all the smoke associated with hot metal, grease and batter – or is that just me?

Ocoa pur noir

I’d also been sent some Clarks maple syrup to try out and waffles seemed the perfect vehicle to do so. Just in time for Pancake Day, I was sent four small 180 ml plastic bottles with squirty tops.  These were nice and easy to use, though I found the syrup to be rather more liquid than I was expecting. Two were pure maple syrup and two were blended with carob fruit syrup, which seemed a little odd and unnecessary to me. I would rather have my syrup pure and dilute or mix it in whatever way I wish, rather than have it done for me. In this instance, I didn’t want to adulterate the pure syrup and simply drizzled it over some of the waffles and served with a little whipped cream and pomegranate seeds. However, I had designs for the vanilla version, which I thought would help to make a luxurious chocolate sauce. For the chocolate sauce, I was also keen to use some of the premium couverture dark chocolate I’d been sent from Cacao Barry, 70% Ocoa pur noir, which I thought would give a particularly rich and fulsome flavour. The aroma wafting up from the packet was of chocolate, caramel and tobacco and the taste lived up to the promise that these smells evoked with multi layered notes hitting the palate in succession.

Maple Syrup

As well as using the maple syrup on the waffles and in the sauce and subsequently in a number of other ways, we tried them neat to get a real sense of their individual characters.

Original (blended with carob fruit syrup) – strong smoky, caramel, rich. Wouldn’t want to eat too much at any one time. Very sweet.

Vanilla (blended with carob fruit syrup) – reminded me of cough medicine that I used to have as a child – something I always viewed as a treat. Aromatic, with a strong vanilla flavour. Very sweet. I used this one in the chocolate sauce to good effect.

Pure Canadian (No.1 Medium Grade) – less runny than the previous two and not as overpoweringly sweet. Smoky and tanniny with a drying-in-the-mouth feel. It was this one that we used on our waffles and it worked well.

Pure Canadian (No.2 Amber Grade) – this proved to be my favourite. It was sweeter than No 1 with a more rounded “maple flavour” but still with the tannins coming through.

The moulds came with instructions and a recipe for sweet waffles and one for savoury. The savoury waffles sounded quite delicious with an addition of Parmesan, oregano and paprika. I am quite keen to try these, but for my first attempt I decided to make waffles that were neither sweet nor savoury so we could add the maple syrup and chocolate sauce without them becoming too sweet. I based the batter on the recipe provided, which gave the perfect amount to fill the eight waffle moulds.

Just out of the oven – see that steam rising?

This is how I made:

Waffles with a Maple Syrup Chocolate Sauce

  • Sprayed the moulds lightly with oil (not something I normally do with silicone, but it is recommended for the first time of use). Placed them on an oven tray.
  • Melted 110g unsalted butter in a pan over low heat.
  • Sifted 240g flour (half wholemeal spelt, half white) into a bowl with 2 tsp baking powder and a pinch of pink rock salt.
  • Made a well in the centre and broke in 3 medium eggs.
  • Started stirring this, slowly adding 410 ml milk until a smooth batter had formed.
  • Added the butter and stirred until incorporated.
  • Ladled the batter into the moulds – there was just enough to completely fill them, but with none left over.
  • Baked in the lower half of the oven at 200°C for 10 minutes or until set.
  • Removed from the oven and turned out onto the oven tray. Placed back in the oven with the pattern side up for a further 5 minutes or so until the waffles were crisp and golden.
Meanwhile:
  • Melted 150g 70% good quality dark chocolate (Ocoa pur noir) with 200g double cream in a pan over low heat.
  • Added 2 tbsp maple syrup and stirred until all incorporated and smooth.
  • Poured the warm sauce over the hot waffles and scattered some pomegranate seeds over the top.

We just loved these. Two each was plenty, but very greedily and because we had them for brunch, we polished off all eight of them. Crisp on the outside and fluffy on the inside, I shall be making these waffles again very soon. Next time, if there are only two of us, I shall try freezing half of them for a quick and easy breakfast, brunch or dessert another time. The chocolate sauce was indeed rich and quite delicious too with a faint hint of maple that gave it an air of added luxury. Having said that, we also enjoyed eating them with cream and pure maple syrup.

Pancake Day is on the 5th of March. I’m seriously thinking of renaming it Waffle Day. maple syrup is, of course, a must – as is chocolate.

Lékué also sent two fabulous stretchy covers that will fit over various sized containers from a half used tin of tomatoes to, in this instance, a bowl of chocolate sauce. They are also good for covering half eaten pieces of fruit such as an orange or melon. The reusable covers act as temporary lids creating a vacuum seal to keep leftovers fresh – a much better option than clingfilm in my opinion. As there was plenty of chocolate sauce left over, I used one to cover the bowl. It was both easy to put on and easy to take off. The remaining chocolate sauce was used to make the truffle icing for my chocolate Valentine cakes.

Thanks to Lékué for sending me the waffle moulds and stretch tops to try out and to Clarks and Cacao Barry for the maple syrup and chocolate. I was not required to write positive reviews and as always all opinions are my own.

Apple and Raisin Pancakes with Chocolate Sauce and a Frying Pan Review

Pancake StackHaving seen a a review of the Ozeri Green Earth Frying pan over at Elizabeth’s Kitchen Diary with its toxin-free, non-stick qualities, I was keen to try it out for myself. I fell in love with the cheerful lime green colour, despite my desire for only red equipment in my kitchen. I particularly liked its non-polluting environmental credentials. I’ve always been very wary of non-stick cookware and have tried to steer clear of it due to its purportedly toxic nature. Made out of heavy-gauge anodized aluminium for even cooking, the natural ceramic coating on this pan is 100% PTFE and PFOA free, meaning there are no heavy metals or chemicals present. The surface is textured which apparently helps to prevent food sticking and also speeds up cooking times by allowing heat to flow underneath the food. Ozeri claim that the coating is more durable and scratch resistant than other non-stick pans – only time and use will tell on that one.

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White Chocolate Sauce – Random Recipes #16

Pudding, Sauces | 27th May 2012 | By

Well how exciting. For the very first time, Dom is allowing us to have a choice for this month’s Random Recipes – a limited choice perhaps, but nevertheless a choice. It’s a chance for those sadly neglected first and last recipes in a book to have their day and hopefully shine. So I collected all of my chocolate books together (and they are slowly growing) and asked CT to do his usual and select a random number between 1 and 10. Dah dah – for the second time For Chocolate Lovers by our local celebrity chefs the Tanner Brothers took centre stage. The first recipe in the book was for banana and chocolate souffle pancakes, the last for white chocolate sauce. Oh a difficult choice here, which to go for? Actually, it wasn’t in the least bit difficult because neither CT nor myself are particularly fond of bananas. White chocolate sauce it was then.

This hardly rates as a recipe at all. A simple process of melting chocolate with milk and stirring. I used a slightly less fussy method to the one in the book to reduce on washing up, but didn’t do anything fancy. I used Green&Blacks white chocolate because it is particularly vanillary. It would be fun to experiment with other flavours though – chilli, citrus zest, nutmeg, cardamom, cinnamon, black pepper to name but a few.

This is how I did it:

  • Broke up 100g bar of white chocolate (G&B) into a pan.
  • Added 125ml milk.
  • Placed on a low heat and left until the chocolate had melted.
  • Stirred until smooth.
  • Poured into a jug.

This was very sweet but quite tasty and was especially good over unsweetened strawberries. I also tried it over the chocolate ice-cream which will be featuring in my next post. As it’s such a quick and easy sauce to make and works well either hot or cold, it would be good served hot to spruce up anything that would normally be served with custard or cold as a substitute for cream.