Vegetarian food blog featuring nourishing home cooked recipes, creative baking and luscious chocolate.

Malted Wholemeal and Rye Loaf

Malted Wholemeal Rye Bread

Bread & Buns | 16th August 2015 | By

Making your own bread can be infinitely satisfying and I have been doing it since I was a teenager. I’ve not been hugely creative and tend to stick to a tried and tested recipe and until I got my KitchenAid earlier this year, I’d never used a machine before. Time to do something different.

I’ve been making rye sourdough for the last six years. It’s easy and doesn’t require kneading;  it fits in well with a busy lifestyle and a rather cluttered counter top. But it’s nice to ring the changes. I do this by making a no-knead bread in this rather excellent silicone bread maker. However the KitchenAid has allowed me to make something different again – breads that require kneading. My first venture was this malted wholemeal and rye loaf that I made up on the spot. It worked so well, I’ve made it several times since, both with dried and fresh yeast. Latterly, I’ve been adding linseeds to the mix for added texture and nutrition.

Malty Wholemeal Rye Bread

It’s a substantial loaf, but less dense than my rye sourdough. I used a mix of strong wholemeal, rye and oak smoked malted flours, all stoneground and organic. Forget these if you are looking for a light and airy loaf though. The bread is utterly delicious with a malty undertone and subtle smokey notes. It makes fantastic toast, but is also good just as it is with Cornish Gouda and homemade chutney.

Malted Wholemeal and Rye Loaf
Yields 1
A substantial wholesome loaf, which is easy to make and quite delicious with malty smoky notes. Makes great toast.
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
1 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
1 min
Ingredients
  1. 400 ml warm water
  2. 1 tsp honey (or malt extract)
  3. 25g fresh yeast or 20g (2 heaped tsp) dried yeast
  4. 300g strong wholemeal
  5. 150g oak smoked malted flour
  6. 150g rye
  7. 1 rounded tsp sea salt
  8. 50g linseeds (optional)
Instructions
  1. Mix the yeast, honey and water together until the yeast has dissolved.
  2. If kneading by hand, place flours, salt and linseed, if using, into a large bowl, make a well in the centre and gradually add the yeast mixture stirring as you go until the mixture comes together to form a dough. Knead for a good ten minutes.
  3. Otherwise, throw everything into the bowl of an electric mixer and using the dough hook knead on a low setting for ten minutes.
  4. Place dough into a floured proving basket or bowl. Cover and leave to rise until nearly doubled in size.
  5. Turn out of the basket onto a baking tray and slash the top with a knife two or three times.
  6. Bake at 220ā„ƒ for 20 minutes, then turn the oven down to 200ā„ƒ and bake for another 20 minutes or until the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
Notes
  1. Vegans can substitute malt extract for honey.
  2. The longer the rise, the more digestible the bread will be. It will rise very quickly in a warm environment and much slower in a cool one.
  3. Total time does not include proving time.
Tin and Thyme http://tinandthyme.uk/

Bready Steady Go LogoI’m sending a slice of this to Jen’s Food where you will find this month’s Bready Steady Go which is co-hosted by Michele over at Utterly Scrummy Food for Families.

 

 

Bake of the Week BadgeJen also has the pleasure of receiving this for Bake of the Week which, in Helen’s absence, she is hosting over at Jen’s Food.

Other wholemeal breads you might like
Tags: ,

Comments

  1. Leave a Reply

    Sammie
    16th August 2015

    Ooh I’m drooling – sorry! I love making my own bread and this loaf looks absolutely scrumptious. I’m actually on hols with the family in Devon and yes, I have made both bread & scones since being here!!! Usually I use my bread machine to mix & prove before finishing off by hand. Love that you’ve used your Kitchen Aid. This loaf really looks gorgeous, I like bread with a bit of substance to it, the mix of flours in yours sounds delicious. Sammie http://www.feastingisfun.com

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Thank you Sammie. Homemade bread and scones on holiday sounds perfect. I bet the family appreciate it. Hope you’re having a fab holiday. Using the bread machine to mix and prove only seems to be the preferred method for everyone I know who has one.

  2. Leave a Reply

    Dom
    16th August 2015

    this looks so good and as you know I made almost exactly the same loaf this weekend… I love this loaf and i’ve only really just started baking with rye flour and i’m really loving the texture. It tastes amazing toasted too which is always a bonus for me as I love toast!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Rye flour is a wonder Dom and it works surprisingly well in cakes too. Your bread always looks fantastic, but it is fun experimenting with different flours and recipes as you never know when your next favourite will pop up.

  3. Leave a Reply

    Camilla
    16th August 2015

    What a perfect looking loaf, I love rye bread:-) This would also be a great #CreditCrunchMunch entry:-)

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Thanks Camilla. I’m just about to have some for lunch now šŸ™‚

      Not sure how this fits into CCM as the flours used are not cheap, but I did mean to link my previous recipe up, so will try not to forget again.

  4. Leave a Reply

    Jacqueline Meldrum
    16th August 2015

    That looks wonderful Choclette. I have more and more been thinking about bread making again. I do miss it and need to make time for it. Just need to replace my oven that conked out this week first. Thanks for linking to me.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Oh no Jac. A broken oven is NOT fun. I guess if it’s going to break though, summer is the best time for it. Hope yo get it sorted soon and back into bread-making too šŸ™‚

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Thank CC, glad you like the look of it. I was a little disappointed you didn’t see the Black Forest Gateau I posted earlier in the week – it had to be done!

  5. Leave a Reply

    Angie@Angie's Recipes
    16th August 2015

    A lovely artisan bread. Choclette. p.s did you use malt or or malted flour? Didn’t see it mention on the list of ingredients. And what kind of rye did you use?

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Hi Angie. So glad someone reads my recipes and picks up mistakes. Thanks for drawing this to my attention. All flours are organic wholemeal stoneground and the malted one was an oak smoked malted flour.

  6. Leave a Reply

    Kavey
    16th August 2015

    Totally agree, making bread is a pleasure. Even better is the pleasure of eating it – my husband has become the breadmaker in our house, most of our sourdoughs are white but we did one with an ancient type of wheat, not spelt, I forget the name. Dense and rich. Need to experiment further with more types of flour.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Well I have to agree with you there Kavey. If delicious healthy home baked bread just happened to turn up, I might not be that sad to only be eating it.

  7. Leave a Reply

    Glamorous Glutton
    16th August 2015

    I love rye bread but I haven’t ever made any. I used to bake bread a lot , but we seem to eat so little bread at the moment that I’ve stopped. This would be perfect though for some of my Scandi dishes. GG

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Ahhh, no bread GG? I’d find it very hard to go for more than a couple of days without it. And yes, this sort of bread would be great with Scandi food.

  8. Leave a Reply

    lisa
    16th August 2015

    This sounds amazing and how unusual with the smoked malted flour! Bread making is one skill I wish I was better at, so will have to go out and find the ingredients for this and give it a go!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Wholemeal breads are usually a lot more forgiving than white bread I find, so it’s not a bad one to start with Lisa.

  9. Leave a Reply

    Janice
    16th August 2015

    Looks fabulous. I really must start reading FB requests properly and not post up things that are not relevant, doh! I recently bought a dough hook for my elderly Kenwood Chef and am also impressed with the results, better than the bread machine in my opinion.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Ah no worries Janice, sorry for not being more specific. I have a real soft spot for the Kenwood. My mother still has hers going back to the year dot. Look forward to seeing what you and your dough hook come up with.

  10. Leave a Reply

    Kath
    16th August 2015

    Gorgeous. I am glad to see the Kitchen Aid being put to very good use. May the new bread adventures continue. x

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      16th August 2015

      Thanks Kath. Expect I will get stuck in a rut with this one now! Though I have also made a sourdough with the same mix of flours which worked really well too.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      17th August 2015

      Thank you Chris, I think I have to agree with you. And the smell wafting from the oven as it is cooking is pretty dreamy too.

  11. Leave a Reply

    Fareeha
    17th August 2015

    what not to love about it.. looks so good and must taste amazing, I bet.. I wish we were neighbors

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      17th August 2015

      Haha Fareeha, I sort of wish I was neighbours with pretty much all the bloggers I visit šŸ˜‰

  12. Leave a Reply

    Brian Jones
    17th August 2015

    I’m still trying with bread, I find the process much more stressful rather than cathartic… I love malty bread so this sounds perfect for me and we squirrel it away for later when I am a little less bruised from my last bread making escapade šŸ˜‰

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      17th August 2015

      Make something simple and stick to it until you’re happy with it Brian. It’s worth persevering – honestly. Wholemeal flours are actually much easier to work with than white ones.

  13. Leave a Reply

    Madiha Nawaz
    17th August 2015

    I’ve made bread at home quite a few times and it has been a time consuming method but I really liked your recipe considering it’s doesn’t require kneading! Shall be trying it for sure.
    Thanks very much for sharing!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      17th August 2015

      Ah Madiha, this one does require kneading, although I have a no-knead recipe on my blog. I used a machine to do the kneading for this one.

  14. Leave a Reply

    Elizabeth
    18th August 2015

    Oooh oak smoked malted rye! That sounds amazing, and your loaf looks so incredibly delicious!

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      18th August 2015

      Thank you Elizabeth, I just had some for lunch and it really is delicious šŸ™‚

  15. Leave a Reply

    Made With Pink
    18th August 2015

    This looks delicious. I’ve always loved rye bread, and never really thought to make my own but yours has turned out wonderful, I think I’d like to try this. I need to better my bread making skills. Yeast scares me :-s

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      19th August 2015

      Oh don’t be scared by yeast, simple bread is really easy to make and wholemeal flours are a lot more forgiving than white.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      21st August 2015

      Thanks Nadia, I really like my rye bread too, but it’s nice to mix it up with other flours from time to time šŸ™‚

  16. Leave a Reply

    Jen
    23rd August 2015

    That looks like the perfect loaf to enjoy with cheese. I’ve not used malted flours in my bread yet, really like the sound of that oak smoked flour. Thanks for linking up with #BreadySteadyGo šŸ™‚

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      24th August 2015

      I love malty notes Jen, although using malted flour is a bit of a departure for me too on the bread front. I tend to use Bachaldre Mill flours – they have a good range and are all organic and stone ground.

  17. Leave a Reply

    Ryan Malkin
    31st August 2015

    Typically white flour has a shelf life from milling of 12 months. Wholemeal flour will be good for 6 months.

    • Leave a Reply

      Choclette
      1st September 2015

      Thanks for that information Ryan. I guess it makes sense that the more highly processed flour will last longer.

Leave a Comment

You can use these HTML tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>